FALL 2018

Non-Fiction Film – HACU 0107-1
M 01:00PM 03:50PM, LAB M 07:00PM 09:00PM

Abraham Ravett

Description
Non-Fiction Film: This is an introductory course for students who would like to explore their interest in documentary practice. Through a combination of screenings, lectures, readings and technical workshops, we will explore a critical/historical overview of this genre and incorporate our knowledge and experience to produce individual or collaborative projects in a variety of “modes of representation.” Projects need not be restricted to a particular medium; in fact, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which film, video, and/or animation can be utilized together.

Boring Pictures: An Introduction to Photography and Looking –  HACU-0115-1 
T 12:30PM 03:20PM

Billie Mandle

Description
Boring Pictures: An Introduction to Photography and Looking: Online platforms often privilege the new, the exciting and the dramatic. But the online world and digital photography can also convey the ordinary, the mundane and the dull. This class will open a space for making pictures and reading pictures that might be overlooked – or even considered boring. What does it mean to be bored and what is a boring picture? We will study a range of artists who use seemingly simple images as a way to speak about complex and potent ideas. We will explore the language used to describe images, practice a range of photographic techniques, and exercise slow looking. Students will be expected to make and present photographs at weekly critiques, keep a detailed online photographic journal and complete written assignments.

 

Digital Resistance
 – HACU-126T-1 
WF 10:30AM 11:50AM, T 07:00PM 09:00PM

Kara Lynch

Description
Digital Resistance: This introductory seminar on media analysis and production will consider how constructions of power are embodied in technologies and conversely, how technologies shape our notions of authority and how we actively mobilize against it. In recent years, access to information and images has shifted dramatically. PDAs/Handheld technologies, social media networks, live web-streaming, video games, and podcasts eclipse mass-media broadcast channels distributing entertainment, news, and information. Drawing upon Media Arts, Critical Ethnic Studies, and Cultural Studies, we will examine models of Digital Resistance like Citizen Journalism, Community Access, Artivism, Hacktivism, and Digital Movements like BlackLivesMatter, Occupy, Arab Spring, and IdleNoMore in order to understand: precursors to contemporary innovations; Corporate Media and Government gatekeeping of information; modes of production; the relationship between media, information and action. Through readings, responses, and visual projects, students will learn to critically read and make digital media and contend with it as a mass language.

 

Rocking the Boat, Shaping the Vote, Making Media for Democracy
- HACU-0202-1 
W 09:00AM 11:50AM, SCR W 06:00PM 08:00PM

Hope Tucker

Description
Rocking the Boat, Shaping the Vote, Making Media for Democracy: In this media production workshop, we will study historic and contemporary examples of campaigns produced for political groups and movements as we make media for change and transformation. Students will analyze works created by corporations, collectives, citizens and artists and use this knowledge to create work of their own. This course is open to students of all levels; production experience is not expected. Hands on technical workshops will reinforce or introduce production and design skills. Our workflow will incorporate research and development of an idea, production, editing, revision and exhibition. The final work of the course will be created in response to the upcoming midterm elections, an international, national, or local issue or movement such as gun control or reproductive justice or net neutrality or Black Lives Matter. Required weekly screenings will include international ads, feature films, and video art. Print, radio, performance, and social media will also be examined. Readings will include cultural, historical, critical, and literary texts. Interested students should come to the first class session. Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session and evening screening risk losing their place on the class roster.

 

Video I: Production Sketchbook
 – HACU-0209-1 
M 09:00AM 11:50AM, SCR M 07:00PM 09:00PM

Patricia Montoya

Video I: Production Sketchbook: Video, still images and sound are used in this course to explore the fundamental character of story telling, filmmaking and time-based art practices. Students perform all aspects of production with particular attention to developing ideas and building analytical and critical skills. We will read seminal written work and interviews with practicing avant-garde artists in order to expand our knowledge, understanding and love for the medium. Through exercises that include in-class and weekly projects students will produce sketches aimed at exploring video as an experimentation tool. There will be special emphasis paid to sound design that includes original music, and ambient sound gathered with separate sound recorder. The class will review the history of video art to give students the basic theoretical tools to critique their own productions and develop an understanding of the possibilities that medium offers. Enrolled students and top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

 

Film Workshop I – 
HACU-0210-1 
Prerequisites Required
W 09:00AM 11:50AM, SCR W 07:00PM 09:00PM

Abraham Ravett

Description
Film Workshop I: This course teaches the basic skills of 16mm film production, including camera work, editing, animation, optical printing and preparation for a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and DVDs that represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in a final project. The bulk of the work will be produced in 16mm format including animation, optical printing, plus a variety of ways to self process film or create cameraless moving images. Digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be supported.

 

Still Photography Workshop I: B&W Analog with Medium and Large Formats
 – HACU-0211-1 
Prerequisites Required
TTH 09:00AM 11:50AM

Kane Stewart

Description
Still Photography Workshop I: B&W Analog with Medium and Large Formats: This course emphasizes three objectives: first, the acquisition of basic photographic skills, including composition, exposure, processing, and printing in the black and white darkroom; second, familiarity with historical and contemporary movements in photography and the development of visual literacy; third, the deepening and expanding of a personal way of seeing. This course will be taught using medium and large format cameras. Cameras will be available through media services. Students will have weekly photographing and printing assignments and, in addition, will complete a portfolio by the end of the semester.

 

Research Methods for Creative Practice – 
HACU-0219-1 
Prerequisites Required
TH 09:00AM 11:50AM, SCR TH 06:00PM 08:00PM

Hope Tucker

Description
Research Methods for Creative Practice: This course provides an opportunity for students to discover what research practice can look like for those working in film, photography, video, installation, and related media. Readings, screenings, creative exercises, library workshops and artist talks which address conceptual approaches, working methods, and a range of research strategies will allow students to deepen their research skills as they develop projects of their own. By looking within texts by artists, filmmakers, photographers, performers, poets, and journalists, such as Santiago Alvarez, Joan Beifuss, Duncan Campbell, Tacita Dean, Kevin Jerome Everson, Mariam Ghani, Sharon Greytak, Ichi-F, Coco Fusco, Gifford Hampshire, Naomi Kawase, Spike Lee, John Lewis, Mary Ellen Mark, Mike Nichols, Mika Rottenberg, Doris Salcedo, Chick Strand, Camilo Jose Vergara, Travis Wilkerson, Peter Watkins, Ernest Withers, and Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the class will examine research-based approaches to developing, creating and realizing new works. Each student is required to present their work in various stages throughout the semester. The members of the class will provide critical, technical and production support for one another. Active contributions to all sessions are required of each student under the guiding principle that tracking each other’s intellectual and creative process will help each person develop their respective project. This course provides a structured context in which to do research intensive work at the Division II level. Enrolled students and top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

 

Abundance: Making art and politics with and from a land-base – 
HACU-0258-1 
Prerequisites Required
W 02:30PM 05:20PM, LAB W 07:00PM 09:00PM

Kara Lynch

Description
Abundance: Making art and politics with and from a land-base: What are sustainable practices that expand and promote our vision of freedom? This course will focus on installation and community engaged art practices in conversation with diverse media and the local ecosystem. The thematic focus of the seminar will critically engage in the question: How can we create a dynamic practice in which to pursue and create artistic, agricultural, ecological, and socio-economic equity? Aware of our daily investments in settler-colonialism, how will we in our practices steward this land with seven generations at the forefront? As a class we will draft a mission statement and plans of action through installation to approach these questions. This hands-on, project-based course will look at relationships built between artists, activists, agriculturalists, and communities to build a sustainable past, present, and future. This course will introduce students to a variety of visual art media and time-based art production. This course is ideal for students interested in art, ecosystems, agroecology, collective and community engagement.

 

Equipment and Workspaces
The Culture and Idea of Photography – CSI-0224

TH 07:00PM 10:00PM

Lorne Falk

The Culture and Idea of Photography: This course is about the centrality of the photographic image- that is, an image produced by mechanical means-in our visual experience, in the rituals, practices and representation of everyday life. Since we no longer, if ever, experience an image in isolation from our experiences of other images and mediums, the culture and idea of photography is understood as utterly diverse in its functions. We will consider photography’s histories, theory and practice, especially its relation to “images that move” and its profound role in what we now understand as visual culture. We will examine theoretical, social and cultural issues and contexts influencing image culture through specific examples from contemporary photography, video, media art and other visual media.

 

 

Writing for Film and Video
 – HACU-0276-1 
T 09:00AM 11:50AM, SCR T 05:00PM 07:00PM

Patricia Montoya

Description
Writing for Film and Video: This course emphasizes the structural character of the script writing process. The class will analyze different scripting techniques in traditional and experimental non-fiction film and video. With special attention to development and format, the course focuses on writing and it will introduce students to the ways in which writing and meaning are created in moving images through concepts such as mise-en-scene, dialogue, world of story narration and dialogue. From idea to pitch, from script to production, students will develop the treatment and production schedule to produce three short dialogue or interview-driven videos.

 

Photo III: Advanced Photography – 
HACU-0292-1 
Instructor Permission Required
Prerequisites Required
M 09:00AM 11:50AM

Billie Mandle

Photo III: Advanced Photography: The focus of this course is the development of a semester-long photographic project. Students will acquire the technical and critical skills needed to create and sustain an in-depth body of work. They will plan, research and edit a project with the aim of effectively conveying complex narratives, ideas and questions through images. The class will also focus on refining critique skills, writing about art, and researching funding for projects. Artist visits and presentations will further acquaint students with contemporary photographic practices and the potential of long-form photographic work.