the top ten things about div I — number three!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10#9, #8, #7, #6, #5, and #4 and are continuing on to #3!

#3: Going to Hampfest, Joining Student Groups, and CEL-1

hampfestBy now you’ve probably checked out your housing assignment and course schedule for the coming year and are getting excited for what’s to come once your first year at Hampshire begins. So many new experiences are on the horizon, including getting to choose and participate in cool student groups! During your first couple of weeks here, you’ll have the chance to attend Hampfest, Hampshire’s student activities fair, which is held at the beginning of each semester. Hampfest is an opportunity for over 100 student groups to showcase what they do and for you to learn more about each group!

Joining a student group can be a really fun and rewarding way to get involved with the Hampshire community. With such a diversity of student groups, there’s bound to be something that piques your interest. Choose from groups such as Hampshire Animal Rights, Hampshire Students Against Mass Incarceration, Guerrilla Arts Brigade, Hamp History, Sexperts, Local Foods Initiative, Crazy Pitches a capella, Climbers’ Coalition, Hampshire Student Union, and more! You can be apart of as many groups as you’d like depending on your level of interest and how much time you can commit. While some groups meet sporadically, most meet weekly or bi-weekly, so make sure not to overbook yourself – especially with a full class load.

For me, being immersed in a variety of student groups was easily one of the best parts of my Hampshire college experience. My time spent as a member of the Sexperts, for example, was an awesome chance for me to be involved in something that I was passionate about but didn’t have the time to focus on in my academics. Through Sexperts, I was able to be apart of a community that was interested in promoting sexual health education and wellness on campus, and eventually, I was able to lead this student group as a “signer” – which was a great way to build my leadership skills and to also complete my Campus Engaged Learning requirement!

During your first year, you’ll need to complete at least 40 hours of a Campus Engaged Learning activity, AKA your CEL-1. CEL-1 activities allow you to make active connections between your academic pursuits and the other areas of your life. Being involved in a student group is a great way to take care of your CEL-1, although it’s certainly not the only way to do it. You could volunteer at different campus events, like the annual Queer Conference, or take part in the Green Dot Active Bystander Intervention Training. You could even take an outdoors class through Hampshire’s athletic/outdoor program and have that count as credit! Just make sure to be in close communication with whoever is facilitating your activity to make sure that you’ll receive credit for the hours you put in. With that said, happy activity hunting!

the top ten things about div I — number four!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10#9, #8, #7, #6, and #5, and are continuing on to #4!

#4: Getting Involved with New Student Programs

photoIf you’re reading this blog post right now, you’re already on your way to getting involved with Hampshire College’s New Student Programs (also known as newtohamp)! From information to help you prepare for your arrival here to navigating Hampshire, the office is committed to helping you make the most of your time during your first year. New Student Programs organizes your new student orientation, but the orienting doesn’t stop there – throughout the year, you’ll have the chance to take part in special programs and events offered by this office to keep you on track and involved. Have a question about forms you need to fill out before getting here? New Student Programs can assist you! Want to practice giving an oral presentation, but don’t know where to do so? Not to worry, they offer all sorts of workshops to help with your academic work – snacks are always provided!

Through New Student Programs, you can win weekly care packages, eat cake on Cake Friday to celebrate the end of the semester, learn life management skills through various workshops, and more. Jessica Ortiz, the director of New Student Programs, is always available to answer any questions you may have about being a first-year or transfer student at Hampshire. New Student Programs is here to help ease the transition into a new place — so don’t hesitate to reach out!

Contact them at newtohamp@hampshire.edu!

the top ten things about div I — number five!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10#9, #8, #7, and #6, and are continuing on to #5!

#5: Preparing for Internships and Study Abroad Experiences

Whether you’re looking for something full or part time, paid or unpaid, and/or during the school year or the summer, Hampshire has the services you need to help find an internship that suits your needs. Since you’ll already be exploring many new academic subjects and interests, there’s no better time to begin sorting out an internship than during your Div I. You can do an internship in pretty much any much field, and, with approval from your faculty advisor, may even be able to use your internship to fulfill your Community Engaged Learning requirement during your second and third years at Hampshire. Internships are a great way to dive deeper into your passions and gain valuable contacts and resources for the future! Not sure where you’d want to internship? The Career Options Resource Center (CORC) can help you figure that out as well! The CORC staff is readily available to answer any questions you may have.

My internship with an arts and dialogue/leadership training based organization completely shifted not just my academic path, but my personal mentality as well. It was a truly phenomenal experience, and with funding assistance from Hampshire’s Community Partnerships for Social Change office, it was also completely financially possible for me to work with this organization three years in a row.

In addition to being able to make your internship possible, Hampshire can also help you to plan and organize your Study Abroad experiences (you can study abroad and have an internship at the same time, by the way). Whether you’re interested in learning a new language, exploring a new place, doing independent research, or taking part in a service-learning project, the Global Education Office can guide you to the right study abroad program for you.

Learn more about GEO: https://www.hampshire.edu/geo/global-education-office-geo
Learn more about CORC: https://www.hampshire.edu/corc/career-options-resource-center
Learn more about CPSC: https://www.hampshire.edu/cpsc/community-partnerships-for-social-change

 

the top ten things about div I — number six!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10#9, #8, and #7 and are continuing on to #7!

#6: Meeting New People From All Over The World

Did you know that students from all over the world come to be a part of the Hampshire College community? With students hailing from all over the United States and over 30 countries as well, there’s no doubt that you’ll make new friends from many different places! This is one of the most exciting things about being in a college setting — you get to be in an environment full of different life experiences and unique personal narratives. Each person you meet may offer you a fresh perspective, so don’t be afraid to start up a conversation. You might meet some of these potential new peers on your hall, in class, in a student group meeting, or even on the bus coming from a Five College class!

Since Hampshire is a part of the Five College Consortium, you’ll have an opportunity to explore the other four colleges in the area and meet even more new friendly faces. It might seem nerve-wracking at first, but introducing yourself to others could end up in long lasting friendships or insightful conversations! I promise, branching out is a good thing.

During my four years at Hampshire, I was always amazed at how all of the folks I’d meet on a daily basis had such diverse backgrounds. There were, of course, things that we shared in common, but what I appreciated more than having things in common with one another was having experiences that made us uniquely us, and being able to bond over those differences. I’m glad to have made friends with folks from near and far who offered me new ways of seeing the world.

Want to learn more about the Five College Consortium? Visit http://www.fivecolleges.edu!

the top ten things about div I — number seven!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10#9, and #8 and are continuing on to #7!

#7: Unlimited Food in the Dining Commons

BAFeeling hungry? The Dining Commons has all sorts of meal options to satiate you! As a student living in the dorms, you are enrolled in an unlimited meal plan, meaning that you can eat in the dining hall as many times a day/week as you’d like. Not living in the dorms? Never fear! There are voluntary meal plans for you to take part in if you’d like to enjoy what the Dining Commons has to offer as well. Whether you eat everything and anything under the sun, are gluten-free, or have other dietary needs, there will always be something for you to eat.

The menu changes daily for each meal. You can expect to always have at least two or more hot entrée options, an extensive salad bar with ample veggies and more, a fresh deli bar, plenty of desserts to choose from, fruit, and fairly often, a chef on duty to cook to order for you! Do you have a class scheduled during a mealtime? Does your sports team need to eat while on the road to your next big game? The Dining Commons offers a packed-meal service for students who can’t make it to regular eating hours as well as lunch passes for students who take courses on other college campuses and need to eat at those locations. All you have to do is ask! One of the perks of having an unlimited meal plan is that if you’re on campus and don’t have time to spend in the Dining Commons, you can head over to the Bridge Café for a meal swap instead. With the meal swap, you can get a full meal and not have to pay additional money for it – it’ll just be treated like a meal you took in the Commons! Either way, each student has $155 in Bridge Café money per semester on their One Cards, so you’ll always have access to food there.

During my first year, it was tradition for my hallmates and me to all go to the Dining Commons for Saturday brunch in our pajamas. I remember how excited we always were to make waffles with the waffle iron, drink local chocolate milk, and eat all the hash browns we possibly could. During the week, we’d swing by the Bridge for sushi and a quick game of pool before heading to the library. I loved making traditions like these with my friends — it made dining at Hampshire an even tastier experience!

Have additional questions about dining at Hampshire? Check out our food provider’s website here: http://hampshire.cafebonappetit.com/

the top ten things about div I — number eight!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10 and #9, and are continuing on to #8!

Screen shot 2015-07-21 at 2.02.47 PM#8: Get Close With Your Tutorial Class Members (And Your Professors, Too)!

Getting excited about which courses you’ll take during your first year? There are so many great options! As we mentioned in the last blog post, you’ll have to choose at least one course in four out of the five different academic distributions, but don’t stress about making that all happen within your first semester – you’ve got all year to meet this requirement. What you will take in your first semester is your tutorial course, your preferences for which you ranked earlier this month in the course preference form. What is a tutorial course? Why is it important? Tutorials are 100-level courses that are designed specifically for you – the entering student – and are meant to help acclimate you to the academic structure at Hampshire. There are tutorial courses offered in each of the different schools within Hampshire, so you’ll be able to study something that interests you while learning all sorts of other great information about Hampshire’s academic program.

Your tutorial course consists of a small group of students and your professor, who also serves as your academic advisor for your first year at Hampshire. Once you’ve received your tutorial assignment in August, don’t be afraid to get in contact with your advisor. They’re here to help give you direction with course selection for the following semester and to answer any questions or concerns you may have about eventually transitioning to Division II (but that’s not for quite some time, so don’t worry too much about that!). Your tutorial advisor can be a wealth of knowledge for helping you network with other professors who could end up being helpful to you further down the road. You’ll also have an opportunity to meet your tutorial professor during orientation on Friday, September 4. Curious about which other students will be in your tutorial class? Well, you’re in luck – during orientation, groups are formed based on your tutorial, meaning you’ll have the chance to spend a whole week with your fellow classmates before classes even start!

Have questions? Need more information? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We’re happy to help!

the top ten things about div I — number nine!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the Office of New Student Programs are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. We started the countdown with #10 in June, and are continuing on to #9!

#9: Study Anything & Everything During Your First Year!

IMG_6516Hampshire requires you to take at least one course in four out of the five different academic distributions during your first year here (including your tutorial – more on that in a future post!), but what classes you end up taking are completely up to you! Our academic system encourages you to try out new subjects based on what sparks your interest, not based on what anyone else thinks is important for you to learn – meaning that you don’t have to take a history course, for example, if that’s not your thing. Instead, choose a variety of courses from at least four out of five of these distributions*:

  • Arts, Design, and Media (Sculpture, Photography, or Teaching Art to Children, for example)
  • Culture, Humanities, and Languages (Sex, Science, and the Victorian Body, or Global Poverty: Theories and Practices, for example)
  • Mind, Brain, and Information (The Social Psychology of Building Peace in the Context of Violent Intergroup Conflict or Computer Animation, for example)
  • Physical and Biological Sciences (Animal Behavior Theory or Natural History of Infectious Disease, for example)
  • Power, Community, and Social Justice (Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin America or Making and Unmaking the School to Prison Pipeline, or example)

Mix and match all sorts of courses to make the schedule that fits your passions the best. If you’re curious about something that you’ve never studied before, use the Division I academic structure to explore it further! Who knows, that class you take on the modern Middle East could completely shift your learning path in a whole new and exciting direction.

Before my first year at Hampshire, I had never taken a visual arts class before. Despite this, I decided to sign up for an Introduction to Sculpting class anyway – and to this day I’m still glad that I did! That sculpting course inspired me to re-envision the ways in which meaningful learning could take place in my life and allowed me to go beyond the so-called limits of my imagination. My entire academic path shifted after taking this course; because I was encouraged to explore different areas of learning instead of only sticking to what I thought I wanted to do, I was able to find a path that suited me best. All in all, the distribution requirement really allows you to check out topics you wouldn’t ordinarily explore – so take advantage of it!

Have questions? Need more information? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We’re happy to help!

 

the top ten things about div I — number ten!

Written by summer orientation assistant ilia Silverman-Esrig 11F

Greetings, folks! We in the New Student Programs office are eagerly anticipating your arrival at Hampshire, as I’m sure you are as well. To start the celebration of your impending arrival, we’ll be counting down the Top Ten Greatest Things about being a Divison I student throughout the summer. Keep your eyes peeled during the coming months as we go from #10 to #1!

#10: Deluxe Dorm Accommodations!

IMG_6488Some of the most important and meaningful conversations you can have take place outside of the classroom, and where better to be a part of these discussions than in your very own dorm? Both Dakin and Merrill have lounges on every hall, each with chalkboard walls for brainstorming and creating, a refrigerator, couches, and a TV. Some even have balconies on them depending on what floor they’re on! Your lounge is a great space for new ideas to blossom in as you hang out and chat with your friends at any time of day or night. When you’re ready to retire, you can head back to your room, complete with furniture that offers flexibility in how it’s arranged so you can truly make your space your own!

Some halls in Dakin have one double (some only have singles!), while each floor in Merrill has two (one on the long hall, one on the short). Approximately two thirds of the incoming class will end up in single rooms, but it’s important to clarify your preferences about your lifestyle and habits on your housing preference form (due by July 1) so if you are placed in a double we can make sure to find you the right roommate match. You can also indicate your preferences for noise level, substance-free housing or not, single vs. multi-gender halls, and, if you’re a transfer student, an international student, a video game enthusiast, queer friendly, study intensive, or a student of color, you can specify that you’d prefer to live on a hall with folks who share those preferences as well!

Another super exciting housing preference worth considering is whether or not you’d like to live in one of Hampshire’s Living & Learning Communities (LLC). To be apart of an LLC, you’ll have to indicate it on your housing preference form and fill out an application as well (also due July 1).  LLCs foster community engagement in a really unique way – you get a chance to live among folks who share a particular common interest or passion around all sorts of subjects. This coming year, there are six different LLCs:

  • Body, Brain, and Culture
  • Community Engagement for Social Change
  • Environmental Justice and Sustainability
  • Looking/Reading/Writing
  • Social Justice
  • Wellness

You can learn more about these communities at http://hamp.it/llc

No matter where you end up living your first year, it’s bound to be an adventure. Make sure to take advantage of all that Residence Life and Housing has to offer you!

Have questions? Need more information? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We’re happy to help!

the top ten reasons to be an orientation leader

Thinking of applying to be an orientation leader, but feeling unsure about making the commitment? Have you already applied, but get so excited every time you think about orientation that you can’t keep your mind on anything else? Great news:

You’ve come to the right place!

We asked current and past orientation leaders to compile a top ten list to describe the experiences they’ve had with the new student orientation program, to give you a better idea of what you can expect as a member of the orientation staff. They think you should apply to be a leader, and so do we! Here’s why:

10. Campus resources! As an Orientation Leader, you’ll likely learn more about the Hampshire campus and campus resources than you have in your first year at Hampshire. A big part of orientation training is learning about these resources so that you can be more informed when working with new first year and transfer students. The information you receive preparing for orientation will undoubtedly benefit you as you continue to navigate your Hampshire experience, and you’ll be super helpful to your orientees.

9. Skills! The skills you’ll learn in orientation training will be useful to you beyond orientation. The leadership skills that you’ll acquire through being an orientation leader will help you to make a positive impact in your community, on and off campus. You’ll also gain facilitation skills by working with your co-leader, you orientation group, and by leading an interest day activity. You’ll build your resume while making a difference in the lives of new students. Sounds good to us!

8. Learning from your peers! As an orientation leader, you’ll be in training sessions with students from all different divisions and backgrounds. Listening to the opinions and experiences of other students when discussing their time at Hampshire can be a great learning experience, and can further expand your understanding of the Hampshire community on the whole.

7. Positive change! Didn’t enjoy your own orientation group experience? As an orientation leader, you’ll have the opportunity to create positive change and help us to improve the new student orientation program. Take what didn’t work for you when you were a first year and make it better for the new students — they’ll thank you!

6. Repeat performances! Can’t get enough Micia Mosely? Love the welcome ceremony? Want to help introduce students to the climbing wall? Looking forward to a new common reading discussion? You can do it all again, and help us to make it even better!

5. Relationship building! You’ll make a lot of new friends during orientation, both with your fellow leaders and the new students coming in. The people you meet could become lifelong friends, all because of the bond you made during the orientation program. (This happens ALL the time!) As an orientation leader, you’ll also become a part of a unique community of orientation staff, a bond that you can carry with you throughout your time at Hampshire.

Golf Cart4. Perks! As an orientation leader, you’ll get to return to campus early, be fed by the orientation program, wear a fancy orientation leader t-shirt, AND receive a $300 stipend. Starting out the year with $300 is a great thing. Who knows, you may even get a chance to take a ride on the orientation golf cart with Josiah Litant and Jessica Ortiz. What’s not to love?

3. Representing Hampshire! Orientation leaders are chosen to be representatives of Hampshire during one of the most important times of the year. As an orientation leader, you’ll represent Hampshire to the community of new students and families, and will have the opportunity to share your experiences with these individuals. It’s an honor to be chosen to represent Hampshire at this crucial time, and something that our leaders are very proud of!

2. It’s fun! Orientation is such a fun time of year, and the positive energy on campus is palpable. It’s warm, it’s sunny, you’re outside, and you’re at Hampshire! Sounds good to us.

1. You know you want to! Seriously, you know you want to, so what are you waiting for? Start your application today by visiting the shared application website. Learn more about what’s required, the selection timeline, and more! Don’t wait — applications are due on Wednesday, March 7!

Still have questions? Come to an information session to learn more about the orientation leader position. Sessions will be held on Thursday, March 1 at 4PM and Friday, March 2 at 2:30PM, both in the Merrill Living Room. Meet Josiah and Jessica and get your questions answered. We can’t wait to meet you!

In the meantime, feel free to e-mail us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu for more information.