creating your division I portfolio

Written by former program assistant Cat Guzman 10F

So, you know what you’ve got to do to pass, but are you still wondering how to do it? I know I was about three years ago, and I remember wishing I had an older student with personal experience help explain the process to me. The Division I portfolio is essentially the culmination of your whole first year at Hampshire—a testament to the things you’ve learned and the best work you’ve done. Reflecting on the year and creating your portfolio now may seem daunting (especially with final deadlines around the corner), but it doesn’t have to be! It’s a time for personal reflection and assessment, and it can actually help you better understand your experience and development thus far as a Hampshire student. If you’ve satisfied all your requirements, the portfolio is really the only thing standing between you and passing Division I. Ready to create it?

Here’s what you want to do:

First, get a 3-ring binder (about 1-2” in size) and some section dividers. Create the following labels for the pieces of the portfolio you need:

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Division I retrospective essay (2-3 pp. recommended length)
  3. Copies of all evaluations and grades you’ve received so far.
  4. A list of courses you’ve completed (indicate which ones satisfy four out of five distribution areas: ADM, CHL, MBI, PBS, & PCSJ)
  5. Documentation of your CEL-1
  6. One section for each of the cumulative skills
    1. Independent Work
    2. Multiple Cultural Perspectives
    3. Quantitative Reasoning
    4. Writing and Research

Next, gather the easy pieces: the Table of Contents page, your printed course evaluations and grades (include all that you have up to this point), a list of your courses that will satisfy Division I, and documentation of your CEL-1.

Then, find a free chunk of time to look through all of the evaluated work you’ve saved up until now and pick your best examples that apply to the each of the four cumulative skills — these pieces will ultimately go into your portfolio. This doesn’t require a day’s worth of work; it can be done in a couple of hours in your room. And if you feel at all confused about what should or shouldn’t go into the portfolio, don’t hesitate to ask your advisor for some helpful advice, like I did. (Note: all of your favorite work may not fit into your binder, but don’t let that stop you from including it in your portfolio! For my Div I portfolio, I decided to include a photography project that consisted of 12 large matted prints. It wasn’t a part of my binder, but my advisor appreciated my choice to present it anyway in my final meeting.)

If you want some company while assembling your portfolio, make sure to stop by the Portfolio Making Party on Tuesday, April 29 at 7PM in the FPH Faculty Lounge. New Student Programs and CASA staff will be on hand to offer advice, supplies, and plenty of snacks. Stop by and spend some time with fellow soon-to-be Div II students!

Writing Your Division I Retrospective:

The retrospective is ultimately a reflection essay — a chance to tell the story of your first year at Hampshire. When writing, consider how you began the year and your expected academic interests. Talk about the academic challenges you faced and the steps you took to meet them, along with the “high points” of your year, including what interested you, what new ideas or topics surprised you, and what you enjoyed the most. Write about your participation and experience in the Hampshire community for your CEL-1 activity. And with the cumulative skills in mind, think of what you learned about each of them along the way.  As you prepare, you may also want to consult your advisor to see if there’s anything specific that they want you to include. The main goal is to provide a clear picture of your progress as a student and member of the community during your first year at Hampshire.

I’d recommend you write it in a quiet and empty space where you can truly focus, whether that’s in your room or in the main gallery of the Liebling photo building. Give yourself the time to re-read it all, re-visit your experiences, and think about why it all mattered. If the assignment seems scary, I promise you it’s easier than it seems! Looking at your best work over the course of your first year at college (all of those written pages, creative projects, research, etc!) is a pretty amazing feeling. You’ll be able to draw conclusions about your work and about yourself. Ultimately, you should feel really proud of all you’ve done and learned so far, and this should definitely help motivate you to finish your portfolio. You’ll want to include a hard copy of your retrospective in your portfolio, but don’t forget to complete the passing process on TheHub as well. You’ll be able to copy and paste your retrospective into the passing form after you’ve finished writing.

…And when you’ve completed all the pieces, get ready to present your work to your advisor in your final Div I meeting!

Remember:

1. These are guidelines to help you better navigate the process of creating your portfolio—don’t feel obligated to work in this exact order, just get it done before the deadline in the best way you know how.

2. Your portfolio and retrospective are what you want them to be. This was the most important lesson I learned last year and the best piece of advice I can pass forward.

Division I is what YOU make it—your overall experience at Hampshire is what you make it. Keep this in mind when you’re creating your portfolio, and enjoy the process!

I hope this helps you—best of luck!

As always, contact newtohamp@hampshire.edu with any questions, comments or concerns. We’re happy to listen and help!

our identities, our community (and why you should attend!)

OIOCAre you a first-year student? Want to learn more about identity and how to engage in dialogue about difference? Our Identities, Our Community, a foundational identity workshop for first-year students, is coming up on Saturday, February 8, and we’d love for you to join us. Want to learn more? Read on for great information, and answers to the most common questions!

What’s this workshop all about?
As individuals, we bring a variety of different identities with us to the Hampshire community, many of which take on new meaning as we immerse ourselves in our new surroundings. As a participant, this workshop will help you to better understand your own multitude of identities, the ways in which they intersect, and how they inform your experiences at Hampshire and in the U.S. You’ll also be introduced to behaviors that support dialogue in a diverse community, with the goal of empowering yourself and others to continue to engage in conversations about social justice, oppression, power, and privilege at Hampshire and beyond.

Who is facilitating the workshop? Anyone I know?
The workshop will be facilitated by the Design Studio for Social Intervention, great friends of Hampshire College who have hosted workshops and trainings for a number of different groups and programs on campus. They have an informative, interactive, and engaging afternoon planned, and can’t wait to share it with you. Staff members from the office of new student programs will also be in attendance to provide support to the facilitators and to connect you with campus resources that will help you extend what you’ve learned beyond the workshop space and into the campus community.

Why would I want to attend something like this?
There are innumerable reasons to attend Our Identities, Our Community, but here are a few of our favorites:

  • You want to engage more deeply in conversation about identity and social justice in class or with other students, but feel intimidated and worried about saying the wrong thing.
  • You want to learn more about your own and others’ identities, how they intersect, and understand how identities can influence individuals’ experiences in the United States.
  • You want to meet other first-year students who share the same interests and passions as you do, and find new ways to connect.
  • You want to learn more about campus resources related to social justice and community advocacy.
  • You want to attend the ASK Conference in late February, and would like to learn some foundational concepts beforehand.
  • You’d like to earn four CEL-1 hours while you learn!

Sounds good to me. When is it and how do I register?
Saturday, February 8
12-4 p.m. (lunch provided)
Franklin Patterson Hall

Registration is limited to 50 participants, so register now to reserve your space!

Questions? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We hope to see you there.

eight great reasons to visit the prescott tavern!

Haven’t been to the Prescott Tavern? Wondering what’s there? The Prescott Tavern offers a combination late-night study and recreational space with activities such as foosball, pool, and board games all week long. Bring your own mug and buy a cup of organic coffee, tea, or cocoa for only 50¢. Assorted snacks are also available for purchase to satisfy your sweet or salty craving at midnight. The tavern is also home to the TavernArt gallery, a fabulous student gallery on campus. If you’re interested in exhibiting your work, email the coordinators at tavernart@hampshire.edu.

Still not convinced? Check out these eight great reasons to visit the Prescott Tavern!
(click on the image below for a better view)

Eight Great Reasons

Still have questions? Need more information? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We’re happy to help!

places you should go: the house offices!

Written by program assistant Cat Guzman 10F

Dakin/Merrill House OfficeIf you’ve visited this blog before, you know that there are a ton of wonderful people to meet on campus that can help with you with just about anything. But here at New Student Programs, we know that there are tons of places you should get to know as well! And we think there isn’t a better place to start than the Dakin, Merrill, Prescott, and Greenwich/Enfield house offices.

In my experience as a third year student, I can tell you that most house offices are often used by non-intern students to occasionally borrow cleaning supplies such as brooms and vacuum cleaners. The house offices definitely have these supplies handy for anyone who might need them, but did you that they offer lots of other goodies too?

You can find:

  • Medicine – such as over-the-counter vitamins and painkillers for a headache or oncoming cold
  • Safer sex supplies – completely free to take, and a great range of them too!
  • Candy/tea/coffee – stop by to make yourself a warm cup of something, or grab a handful of sweets
  • A microwave – warm up food and drinks at your own leisure
  • A lot of games – always free to borrow and use with your friends
  • Craft supplies – feel free to use a few to get creative
  • A bathroom, along with free tampons and pads­ – just in case you’ve gotta go on your way to class!

Additionally, this is the place where you can find the house interns, who can provide directions to any place on campus if you’re lost and offer advice or a listening ear (among other things)! The Dakin and Merrill interns can also help you reserve the Dakin or Merrill Living Rooms for events you might plan. Remember, interns are trained and informed so that you can ask them about any campus resources you might want to find or learn about, and are happy to point you in the right direction!

So, for those who haven’t visited yet, the house offices are located in each housing area (with the exception of Greenwich — the Greenwich/Enfield house office is across from the basketball court in Enfield). The Prescott house office is located at the bottom of the 92-96 stairwell, and the Dakin/Merrill house office is located on the ground floor of the Dakin Student Life Center, next to the Dakin Living Room. There will almost always be an intern there, along with a house director who can also answer your questions, particularly those relating to your housing/living situation. Open hours are generally 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., with interns working different shifts throughout the day. Stop by for a visit when you can!

As always, send any questions or thoughts our way to newtohamp@hampshire.edu!

our identities, our community. (and why you should attend!)

Are you a first-year student? Want to learn more about identity and how to engage in dialogue about difference? Our Identities, Our Community, a foundational identity workshop for first-year students, is coming up on Saturday, October 20, and we’d love for you to join us. Want to learn more? Read on for great information, and answers to the most common questions!

What’s this workshop all about?
As individuals, we bring a variety of different identities with us to the Hampshire community, many of which take on new meaning as we immerse ourselves in our new surroundings. As a participant, this workshop will help you to better understand your own multitude of identities, the ways in which they intersect, and how they inform your experiences at Hampshire and in the U.S. You’ll also be introduced to behaviors that support dialogue in a diverse community, with the goal of empowering yourself and others to continue to engage in conversations about social justice, oppression, power, and privilege at Hampshire and beyond.

Who is facilitating the workshop? Anyone I know?
The workshop will be facilitated by the Design Studio for Social Intervention, great friends of Hampshire College who have hosted workshops and trainings for a number of different groups and programs on campus. They have an informative, interactive, and engaging afternoon planned, and can’t wait to share it with you. Staff members from the office of new student programs will also be in attendance to provide support to the facilitators and to connect you with campus resources that will help you extend what you’ve learned beyond the workshop space and into the campus community.

Why would I want to attend something like this?
There are innumerable reasons to attend Our Identities, Our Community, but here are a few of our favorites:

  • You want to engage more deeply in conversation about identity and social justice in class or with other students, but feel intimidated and worried about saying the wrong thing.
  • You want to learn more about your own and others’ identities, how they intersect, and understand how identities can influence individuals’ experiences in the United States.
  • You want to meet other first-year students who share the same interests and passions as you do, and find new ways to connect.
  • You want to learn more about campus resources related to social justice and community advocacy.
  • You’d like to earn four CEL-1 hours while you learn!

Sounds good to me. When is it and how do I register?
Saturday, October 20
12-4 p.m. (lunch provided)
Franklin Patterson Hall

Registration is limited to 50 participants, so register now to reserve your space!

Questions? Email us at newtohamp@hampshire.edu. We hope to see you there.