New ISP

We have turned up additional bandwidth traveling over our connection to Paetec Inc. Paetec provides the campus with voice services and until recently they provided 10 meg of internet bandwidth to the campus. We route this traffic over the Five College fiber network, starting at Hampshire and terminating at a router located at 1 Federal St in Springfield, MA. We then travel via fiber leased by Paetec, to Boston and terminate at a router located there.

We have partitioned traffic sending all student traffic out the Paetec link- provisioned at 200 meg. We retain a connection to UMass and route all 5 college traffic as well as administrative traffic (ie: email, servers, DNS, etc) out that leg. The UMass connection is currently 45 meg.

Here is the graph for the new Paetec leg.

stout.hampshire.edu Email is Going Away

Last year IT began to move email services to new hardware. As we continue, some email addressing methods have become obsolete and will no longer be accepted. Will it affect you? Probably not, but check to make sure!

The Problem
As you probably know, our old email server was called “stout”. You may still see references to “stout” around, but behind the scenes we’re actually redirecting most of those things to the new hardware. With upcoming changes, we will no longer be redirecting email addressed to stout.hampshire.edu, and will instead bounce it back to the sender.

Why you Might be Affected by this Change
IT always recommends setting up email addresses as “@hampshire.edu”; however, sometimes email program settings may have been set up incorrectly. As a result you may find that :
You have an address in your address book that containing “@stout.hampshire.edu”–because someone you correspond with gave you that address.

When you reply to an email, it is being sent to a “stout.hampshire.edu” address.

Your own email is set up incorrectly, giving people a reply-to address that contains “@stout.hampshire.edu”.

How to Check if it’s a Problem for You
We recommend that you:
Take a quick look at the addresses in your “To” field when you reply to a message. See “@stout.hampshire.edu”? Change it to “@hampshire.edu”.

When sending out messages, read any “bounce” messages to see if they indicate the email was sent to someone “@stout.hampshire.edu”. This would indicate that your address book has an incorrect entry, which you should then find and edit.

Check your own email settings if you use a “client” such as Thunderbird or Apple mail to access your email. If you use Webmail this issue will not affect you. To check if Thunderbird is set up correctly:
In Thunderbird, select Tools–>Account Settings…”

With your Hampshire account selected in the panel on the left, check that your “Email Address” is of the format username@hampshire.edu.

Check that if there is a “Reply-to Address” specified that it is also correctly set as username@hampshire.edu.

If you have a signature with your email address, check that as well.

If you access email through an email client on another computer, such as a home computer, check that as well.

What not to Worry About
The login for Webmail will still have the drop-down for selecting “stout”, which you should continue to use as you have been.

helios.hampshire.edu Email is Going Away

Last year IT began to move email services to new hardware. As we continue, some email addressing methods have become obsolete and will no longer be accepted. Will it affect you? Probably not, but check to make sure!

The Problem
As you probably know, our old email server was called “helios”. You may still see references to “helios” around, but behind the scenes we’re actually redirecting most of those things to the new hardware. With upcoming changes, we will no longer be redirecting email addressed to helios.hampshire.edu, and will instead bounce it back to the sender.

Why you Might be Affected by this Change
IT always recommends setting up email addresses as “@hampshire.edu”; however, sometimes email program settings may have been set up incorrectly. As a result you may find that :
You have an address in your address book that containing “@helios.hampshire.edu”–because someone you correspond with gave you that address.

When you reply to an email, it is being sent to a “helios.hampshire.edu” address.

Your own email is set up incorrectly, giving people a reply-to address that contains “@helios.hampshire.edu”.

How to Check if it’s a Problem for You
We recommend that you:
Take a quick look at the addresses in your “To” field when you reply to a message. See “@helios.hampshire.edu”? Change it to “@hampshire.edu”.

When sending out messages, read any “bounce” messages to see if they indicate the email was sent to someone “@helios.hampshire.edu”. This would indicate that your address book has an incorrect entry, which you should then find and edit.

Check your own email settings if you use a “client” such as Thunderbird or Apple mail to access your email. If you use Webmail this issue will not affect you. To check if Thunderbird is set up correctly:
In Thunderbird, select Tools–>Account Settings…”

With your Hampshire account selected in the panel on the left, check that your “Email Address” is of the format username@hampshire.edu.

Check that if there is a “Reply-to Address” specified that it is also correctly set as username@hampshire.edu.

If you have a signature with your email address, check that as well.

If you access email through an email client on another computer, such as a home computer, check that as well.

What not to Worry About
The login for Webmail will still have the drop-down for selecting “helios”, which you should continue to use as you have been.

All About Skype

More and more interviews and phone conferences are being held through Skype. Here’s what you need to know.

Skype is an internet-based call system, allowing you to make free audio and video calls to other Skype users. It can also be used to call cell phones and landlines, but that costs money.

First, download Skype
To get started you should download the Skype application for your computer. Mac & PC users can go to http://www.skype.com to download it. Mac, iPhone and iPad users can go to the AppStore, and search for “Skype.” Android users can get it through the Marketplace.

Set up an Account
The Skype website provides instructions for setting up a Skype account. For Skype-to-Skype calls you won’t need to pay any money. Video conferencing with a group and Skype-to-phone calls both require a paid subscription.

Internet Connection
The quality of your internet connection is a big factor in the quality of video calls. A wired Ethernet connection is faster than a wireless connection, but either can be used.

Microphone and Speaker
If you’re going to use Skype for voice calls, all you need is a computer (or phone or tablet) connected to the internet, with a microphone to talk into and a speaker to listen.

Obviously a phone has a microphone, as do tablet computers and most laptop computers. Desktop computers may need to have an external microphone hooked up. An external microphone will often improve audio quality. IT or Media Services may be able to help you find a microphone if necessary.

There also needs to be a way for you to listen to the other person, which requires some sort of speaker. Again, a phone or tablet will have one built-in, as will laptop computers; external speakers may improve the audio quality, however. Desktop computers will probably need a set of speakers installed. IT or Media Services may be able to help you find a set of speakers if necessary.

Video Call Requirements
Every device we’re talking about has a screen so that you can see the other person on a video call, but you need a camera in order for them to see you. Many laptops have built-in cameras, as do tablets and phones; older PC laptops tend not to have video cameras, and many desktop computers don’t either. If you need to borrow a video camera, IT may be able to loan you one.

Projecting to a Group
If you need to include a group of people in the room in a video call, it’s helpful to have a projector or TV screen to hook up to your computer. This allows everyone to see the person on the other end of the line. Of course, you may just opt to set up your computer or tablet in a way that makes it visible to everyone around the table.

Test your setup
It’s always a good idea to test the setup before a critical call. You will want to see how the audio sounds and make sure that the images sent and received are acceptable. Skype provides a Test Call feature, which will allow you to test the audio quality; you should engage the services of a friend or colleague to test the video quality–give them a call & make any adjustments necessary.

All About Skype

More and more interviews and phone conferences are being held through Skype. Here’s what you need to know.

Skype is an internet-based call system, allowing you to make free audio and video calls to other Skype users. It can also be used to call cell phones and landlines, but that costs money.

First, download Skype
To get started you should download the Skype application for your computer. Mac & PC users can go to http://www.skype.com to download it. Mac, iPhone and iPad users can go to the AppStore, and search for “Skype.” Android users can get it through the Marketplace.

Set up an Account
The Skype website provides instructions for setting up a Skype account. For Skype-to-Skype calls you won’t need to pay any money. Video conferencing with a group and Skype-to-phone calls both require a paid subscription.

Internet Connection
The quality of your internet connection is a big factor in the quality of video calls. A wired Ethernet connection is faster than a wireless connection, but either can be used.

Microphone and Speaker
If you’re going to use Skype for voice calls, all you need is a computer (or phone or tablet) connected to the internet, with a microphone to talk into and a speaker to listen.

Obviously a phone has a microphone, as do tablet computers and most laptop computers. Desktop computers may need to have an external microphone hooked up. An external microphone will often improve audio quality. IT or Media Services may be able to help you find a microphone if necessary.

There also needs to be a way for you to listen to the other person, which requires some sort of speaker. Again, a phone or tablet will have one built-in, as will laptop computers; external speakers may improve the audio quality, however. Desktop computers will probably need a set of speakers installed. IT or Media Services may be able to help you find a set of speakers if necessary.

Video Call Requirements
Every device we’re talking about has a screen so that you can see the other person on a video call, but you need a camera in order for them to see you. Many laptops have built-in cameras, as do tablets and phones; older PC laptops tend not to have video cameras, and many desktop computers don’t either. If you need to borrow a video camera, IT may be able to loan you one.

Projecting to a Group
If you need to include a group of people in the room in a video call, it’s helpful to have a projector or TV screen to hook up to your computer. This allows everyone to see the person on the other end of the line. Of course, you may just opt to set up your computer or tablet in a way that makes it visible to everyone around the table.

Test your setup
It’s always a good idea to test the setup before a critical call. You will want to see how the audio sounds and make sure that the images sent and received are acceptable. Skype provides a Test Call feature, which will allow you to test the audio quality; you should engage the services of a friend or colleague to test the video quality–give them a call & make any adjustments necessary.